Adventures in Stock Music, YouTube Content Id And AdRev.

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  MichaelL 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #30885 Reply

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    I’m re-posting this from Music1234, in answer to another thread, as it deserves it’s own thread.
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    I have been in communication with a veteran stock music producer who really pushed deep into RF markets starting in 2009 by building up a large offering, then dumped everything into ADREVS content ID while many of us here were paralyzed about what to do. Well it turns out that this producer has done very well with monthly earnings from CID. I think this happened because

    A. he sold a lot of music and the youtubers buying his tracks for their YT videos probably ignored the fact that the monetization was looping back to him because they were using his tune.

    B. he agreed to one of those unusual deals where a lump sum of money was offered for a couple hundred tracks to be dealt “non exclusively in perpetuity” on what is now a subscription site. BUT the writer was still able to sell their tracks on other NE sites.

    Adventures in stock music! The stories that unfold are always fascinating. AND then somewhere in the mix, one of his tunes was picked up on a massive ad campaign in Europe and that stuck tens of thousands of dollars more in his pocket. When I asked where the music was sourced from (Which site) he had no clue. All of this coming from a guy who was “dabbling” in stock music “for fun” on the side.

    So what am I getting at in this story: It sure did pay to be ignorant and just upload your music everywhere and make ill advised deals while simultaneously uploading all your music to ADREV and not fully understanding anything about anything! I love this story! I think it’s amazing!

    #30886 Reply

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    Bump

    #30887 Reply

    Michael Nickolas
    Participant

    But isn’t writers uploading their music everywhere, making ill advised deals, and not understanding anything about anything what we complain about all the time here? Aren’t those the points that we site concerning the devaluation of music and the race to the bottom? I wouldn’t hold this story up as advice to others to follow or consider it amazing. It’s a story of luck, and the same luck could be found in making smart deals and understanding how the business works.

    #30889 Reply

    Music1234
    Participant

    I tend to agree with you Michael. I just get a kick out of this story because it’s a story of “ignorance turned out to be bliss”. It’s also a story where it contradicts everything we thought we were not supposed to do
    -upload and support rf sites
    -upload to adrev while music was being traded on multiple sites and therefore creating a lot of annoyed customers getting take down or copyright claim notices.
    – make an ill advised deal where you grant way too many rights to a company which then dumps the music into a subscription plan. The one good thing that may come out of that deal is the fact that this site does publish PRO info and who knows…maybe the TV spot placement in Europe occurred from their and the paperwork was filed accurately generating a ton of back end.

    The one battle that composers seem to have won with many sites though is the fact that almost all of them now allow PRO registered music and display writer/ publisher names and IPI #’s.

    I am not convinced that high end corporate players in the U.S. buy on those markets for big ad campaigns, but the Europeans seem very willing to use those sites to source music for big advertising campaigns.

    In regards to ADREV, you just kind of get the impression that in the 2012 to 2015 era no one fully understood content ID. People just heard “ADREV” and some mentioned how they were making money in there, so guys just dove in with their tracks.

    One can make a case that everything about this business is “luck”.

    #30891 Reply

    Michael Nickolas
    Participant

    Absolutely. And remember the old saying “Luck Is What Happens When Preparation Meets Opportunity”. Which wasn’t really true in this story. 🙂

    #30892 Reply

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    One can make a case that everything about this business is “luck”.

    Seems that way.

    I am not convinced that high end corporate players in the U.S. buy on those markets for big ad campaigns, but the Europeans seem very willing to use those sites to source music for big advertising campaigns.

    In line with the story about his European ad campaign; I have no idea where our music was licensed from for our latest Oxiclean commercial. A U.S. company and closing in on 4000 airings.

    #30893 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    One can make a case that everything about this business is “luck”.

    Thanks Music1234. The story is anecdotal but a fun, thought provoking read. I tend to agree regarding luck. What we call luck is often a matter of opportunity, being in the right place at the right time. Sometimes, being in the right place at the right time shifts the burden and it’s on us to make the most of it. So, I guess what we do from that point forward determines if it was good luck or bad luck.

    #30894 Reply

    Music1234
    Participant

    One thing for sure though is if you work hard, write and record the music, release it, do the boring metadata, do the upload labor, You have yourself in a position to “get lucky”. It’s also a classic tale of “The early bird got the worm”. Ownership of assets to pick and chose where and how we want to distribute our music is more important than ever at this point in the game.

    In line with the story about his European ad campaign; I have no idea where our music was licensed from for our latest Oxiclean commercial. A U.S. company and closing in on 4000 airings.

    Art, this is fantastic for you, but kind of annoying on another level. You’d think that music licensing sites would just make a point to inform the writer that their track is headed into a big national advertising project. Church and Dwight is a 14 Billion company. The composer of the track should be informed. Congrats on a great sync. Hope it pays well on the back end.

    #30896 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    Ownership of assets to pick and chose where and how we want to distribute our music is more important than ever at this point in the game.

    That is definitely a point worth considering. My current experience is that if we manage our catalogs well we can equal or exceed both the front-end and back-end performance of many (not necessarily all) situations in which composers routinely give up ownership.

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