Changing Trends in Micro/Major Sales

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  • #37865 Reply
    PAMMusic
    Guest

    I have been composing for RF music libraries for just over a year now and it seems to me that the royalty free marketplace is completely dead, especially for newbies like myself who don’t have the sales/reviews from the “good days” keeping their tracks high in the searches. I have found one RF library that provides a fairly regular income but that’s it. If there are any RF fishing holes left that are still proving successful I can’t find them!

    The downward trend in RF has pushed me to approach more Production Libraries which I have been getting accepted on, and have already found much more fulfilling than the RF market.

    Are people noticing a decrease in placements from Production Libraries to the same extent as Royalty free?

    #37866 Reply
    Pat
    Participant

    The trend I see is libraries getting pickier.

    #37867 Reply
    BEATSLINGER
    Participant

    The trend I see is libraries getting pickier.

    There is a lot more supply for right now.

    But also, I talk to a good amount of people regularly, and they say that they closed up accepting new composers because they are making sure their roster stays working. I really commend that!

    #37859 Reply
    Music1234
    Participant

    Hey Joel, to be clear, I am not trying to scare anyone from signing up to Jesse’s sync academy. I guess I am just surprised that 5000 folks have even when the odds are 2% success according to his data. I 100% agree that he lays out an intelligent approach to those trying to get into a library that feeds TV shows and TV networks. T**i does this too. They are on youtube every week educating music producers on how to move your career forward with music libraries who service TV shows, video post houses, and advertising agencies. And indeed, this business requires mountains of patience as it will take most 5 years to 10 years to create a situation where they are potentially making full time income.

    Anyway, anyone reading MLR should be able to find all the knowledge they will need to get going. But here is my advice; you will need 5 to 10 years to get to full time income, and you will have to compose, record, mix and master a minimum of 500 really useful tracks to get there. You should expect make very little in the first two to three years. If you sign all of your music to an exclusive library without compensation or an “advance fee” and others refer to them as “consideration fees” and you lose control of your own catalog in perpetuity, I do not think you will ever get to a full time income.

    I see these markets as changing constantly, and nearly anyone looking to stay active producing music for a living has to be agile and have several bodies of water where they cast their lines.

    You are absolutely 100% correct, if you do not create multiple revenue streams for your catalog, you sure do need revenue from several bodies of water. You need to fish in ponds, lakes, rivers, oceans, canals, and even deep puddles if need be. Some may disagree with me and that is fine, but (in my very experienced opinion) if you continue to sign deals with exclusive publishers and eliminate your ability to find multiple revenue streams for your music, I really believe that you will never achieve full time income.

    #37871 Reply
    Per Boysen
    Guest

    Are people noticing a decrease in placements from Production Libraries to the same extent as Royalty free?

    I got info today from the owner of an exclusive library I’m working with and during the pandemic 2020 the advance went down with 80 percent. I guess that is just as bad as for the RF libs.

    #37874 Reply
    guscave
    Guest

    Are people noticing a decrease in placements from Production Libraries to the same extent as Royalty free?

    I have seen a slow down in placements with Production Libraries, but no where as much as the absolute demise of RF libraries. I never got heavily into RF libraries but I use to get about $200-$300 per month from them. This was with only about 275 songs. That was 3 years ago, Today I’m lucky if I even see a $10 from them.

    #37875 Reply
    Michael Nickolas
    Participant

    I use to get about $200-$300 per month from them. This was with only about 275 songs. That was 3 years ago, Today I’m lucky if I even see a $10 from them.

    Same here. And on top of it Getty terminated agreements with composers and closed down the music portal. They were good for a couple thousand a year.

    #37907 Reply
    justamusicgui1990
    Participant

    Even if that one (hypothetical) exclusive publisher bought everyone of my tracks for say $500 per master, I still would have far less income.

    Music1234 i’m currently getting about 650 per track with a high placement rate (i’m doing full songs w vocals for a library) and have been going at it for a little over 2 years. I keep my writers share of the publishing. I don’t know how i’d get the placements without going through them though. Would your advice be to just try and send directly to these types of shows or are you saying just spreading amongst diff non exclusive libraries?

    #37911 Reply
    Music1234
    Participant

    justamusicgui1990, I just like having full ownership and control of my catalog in perpetuity because it allows me the flexibility to pick where and how to distribute and license my music to buyers. I also feel as though I can eventually earn the $650 back from sync license sales. “Eventually” can be 6 months, but it may also take 3 to 5 years. It takes a lot of time and effort to write, record, mix, and master a great song. I just don’t think $650 is enough incentive for me at this point in my career.

    #37912 Reply
    LAwriter
    Participant

    I would add ESPECIALLY if it’s a vocal song. $650 is not enough.

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