Cool interview with Tony Anderson

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This topic contains 35 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  dpwaveheavy 9 months ago.

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  • #15346 Reply

    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    I thought this interview was really interesting – especially his thoughts on writing music for a living, quality vs quantity etc.

    https://www.themusicbed.com/community/artist-spotlight-tony-anderson/

    And here’s some of his (GREAT) music: http://soundcloud.com/23violins

    #15350 Reply

    yzzman1
    Participant

    Thanks for posting that article. That was quite the read to say the least!

    #15358 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    Thanks for posting Mark. Very insightful. At least my room looks like that! 😀

    #15362 Reply

    More Advice

    I do like his music. What I find confusing though is how the first thing he says in the video is “I don’t know how to read or write music.” He clearly knows something by now. I think he must know how to play a major triad chord and scales on the piano. And he is absolutely right when he says “bringing people in to play, brings life to the music.” I sure would love to have violinists stopping by my studio every day to do what they love to do.

    #15363 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    Almost anyone with a little musical knowledge can crank out catchy ditties that will work for mass media. Tony writes from the heart which is why his music resonates with filmmakers and listeners. And, for the musicians who stop by his studio, it’s clearly not just another meaningless gig.

    It’s a different mindset, not a different skill set.

    #15366 Reply

    AaronM

    I don’t read or write music either. To me, learning music at an early age was like learning English. I could understand and speak it before I could read it. Sure, if I look at a note on a page for a while I can figure out what it says but it’s much easier for me if I just hear the whole song and then play it.

    I’m a little curious now! Do most of you read music?

    #15369 Reply

    Rob (Cruciform)

    Aaron,

    I don’t read or write music. I’ve tried to learn. It’s like I have musical dyslexia. It simply makes no sense to me.

    #15371 Reply

    Chuck Mott

    I can read well enough to figure something out if I need to but generally learn by ear, or by watching.

    #15377 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    The ability to read and write music does not make someone a composer any more than reading or writing a particular language makes someone a novelist.

    #15384 Reply

    56 Strat
    Participant

    Although I learned the fundamentals on how to read and write music much later in the game , just enough to get me by because I teach on the side, I have to put myself in the camp of ” no I don’t ” . Outside of teaching I never use it and never even consider it as I’m self taught and am a ear and instinct player. MichealL correctly says it all in a nutshell.

    #15386 Reply

    AaronM

    @Rob and Chuck: I’m like you guys. I tried taking lesson when I was younger but it seemed like an impossibility. It’s interesting to see all of the different backgrounds people have here.

    @michaell: Well said, I completely agree!

    #15387 Reply

    Vlad
    Participant

    Just playing devils advocate:

    John Williams
    Thomas Newman
    Harry Gregson Williams
    Hans Zimmer
    Steve Jablonsky
    James Newton Howard
    Michael Giachino
    Brian Tyler
    Etc

    On this list, I would bet most or all of them read music (not sure about Brian Tyler)

    Reading music doesn’t make a composer, but I would make an argument that it helps….functionality-wise.

    #15388 Reply

    AaronM

    I agree, it probably does help in some ways. Especially in sharing work with other musicians I imagine when midi etc is not a viable alternative.

    Then again, on the creative side of things, there are a great many painters and other artists with a big fat zero on their resumes in terms of formal education.

    #15389 Reply

    woodsdenis
    Participant

    Just playing devils advocate:

    John Williams
    Thomas Newman
    Harry Gregson Williams
    Hans Zimmer
    Steve Jablonsky
    James Newton Howard
    Michael Giachino
    Brian Tyler
    Etc

    Hans Zimmer famously doesn’t read music, however point well made.

    I learnt how to read at music school, has its uses, and a skill set like many others, it is not a necessity.

    #15394 Reply

    Vlad
    Participant

    Denis,

    I stand corrected.

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