Exclusive vs. Non-Exclusive Strategy?

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  • #10108 Reply
    Jay
    Guest

    that should say grows/evolves.. 🙂

    #10110 Reply
    Glen
    Participant

    Any company wanting my music (that currently sits in their library and search engine non-exclusively) to move into the exclusive column has to make me an offer. Sure, I’ll go exclusive with you, if you cut me a check for $1000 for every track you want to be exclusively yours.

    Just yesterday guys in a thread an owner said:

    “you should never sign over any of your copyrights to a publisher without being properly compensated. Most reputable exclusive libraries in the U.S. provide upfront compensation in exchange for these rights.”

    #10111 Reply
    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    “you should never sign over any of your copyrights to a publisher without being properly compensated. Most reputable exclusive libraries in the U.S. provide upfront compensation in exchange for these rights.”

    Glen, You are mixing apples and oranges here. There are two types of exclusives. One where a company represents your song/cue exclusively for a set period of time but doesn’t take copyright ownership and a company that would own the copyright forever. I very much doubt you will get a music library to pay you $1000 to exclusively represent your track for the typical 3-5 year term.

    #10113 Reply
    Glen
    Participant

    I am talking about “in perpetuity” terms…not 3 to 5 years.

    #10114 Reply
    Glen
    Participant

    If I am not mistaken, Jp wants cues in perpetuity Art.

    #10115 Reply
    mikevan
    Guest

    @Mr.Composer
    well it’s not like we choose ‘not’ to work with EMI/Universal etc… 😉

    I strongly agree with points 3 and 4 though.

    #10116 Reply
    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    I am talking about “in perpetuity” terms…not 3 to 5 years.

    Yes but you have to define “in perpetuity”. In most cases it means “in perpetuity” for the show or project it’s placed in.

    If I am not mistaken, Jp wants cues in perpetuity Art.

    Once again you have to define “in perpetuity”. In JP’s case their exclusive contract is 3 years and “in perpetuity” is for the shows that the music is placed in (IIRC). If they did not have that clause then years down the road the show would have to start replacing music. The last time I looked at the contract that’s what it appeared to me. If you know something different I stand corrected.

    #10118 Reply
    MichaelL
    Participant

    Any company wanting my music (that currently sits in their library and search engine non-exclusively) to move into the exclusive column has to make me an offer. Sure, I’ll go exclusive with you, if you cut me a check for $1000 for every track you want to be exclusively yours.


    @Glen
    , I was going to stay silent in this thread, however…I don’t know you, or your music, but I can tell you that it better be brilliant if you want anyone to pony up $1,000 for it. Those fees are from top tier exclusive libraries, like Megatrax, who do take your copyright…FOREVER. BUT…there are a ton of lesser libraries that pay anywhere from $150 to $500 upfront and still take your copyright..FOREVER.

    So, unless your in that rarified atmosphere of top tier composers and your work is head and shoulders above everyone else…don’t hold your breath.

    Unfortunately, many of the writers here don’t know the type of composers that I, or perhaps “mr composer” are referring to.

    Here’s an example of a great production music composer, who has done over 200 cues for Megatrax. The real deal, not a singer/songwriter, not a beat-maker, not a wannabe pop star, but a library music superstar.

    http://donnwilkerson.com/The_Music_Of_Donn_Wilkerson/Welcome.html

    Here’s another:

    Their music might sound old school to you, but guys like Mr. Wilkerson and Mr. Griffith are few and far between, which is why they command top dollar. Pop, rock, electronica, beat-making are…uh, ubiquitous.

    So, the big strategy question I’d ask anyone, is “where do you fit on the musical food chain?” You’d better know the honest answer to that question before you go all prima donna and demand $1,000 a cue for your music.

    Special note to conservatory cats: Don’t take your pedigree to seriously. Even if your music is academically brilliant it doesn’t matter. What matters is that it works. Too often the highly “schooled” don’t connect with the audience. Mr. Griffith is an example of someone who bridges that gap well.

    Food for thought. Now back to selling my house and searching for the dream studio.

    Cheers,
    MichaelL

    #10138 Reply
    mr.composer
    Guest

    In response to desireinspires, I should perhaps put this into context. It has taken me 10 years to get to this point and has been achieved by working with just 4 uk based mcps libraries. I would never in a million years consider going the royalty free route, but that’s easy for me to say. Not easy starting out now. Very difficult in fact and people doing so certainly have my sympathy and very best wishes.

    Work with a top lib and one album can happily bring you in £30-50k a year if it hits the right note.

    Personally, I’d rather spend a year crafting one track than knocking em out and stacking them high on the dung heap.

    Chuck out the sample CDs and the plug-ins and craft something beautiful and original with genuine musicality and emotion! People don’t seem to craft or properly compose stuff anymore. It’s more just copy and pasting samples. That’s not composing, anyone can do that. I despair sometimes.

    #10139 Reply
    Glen Petersen
    Guest

    @Michael L, I am referring to successful “in demand” proven cues that have already paid JP, and the writer, handsomely in up-front placements and back end royalties. Your example above with Mr. Wilkerson is ridiculous. Any guy conducting in front of 35 musicians better be getting paid 20K to write and produce the film cue…not 1K…Michael L…I have participated in sessions with entire orchestras in the studio The budget was 35K!. If a cue has proven to generate up-front license fees and royalties that exceed a few grand…and now a library wants it exclusively….they need to buy you out in my opinion…not just take control of it for free. 1K is a good starting point….if you settle on $500…yes you still succeeded. I am simply encouraging musicians to ask to be paid for exclusive in perpetuity representation. If you keep giving your music to libraries and just keep piling cues and piling cues on “exclusively to them, in perpetuity, for no advance fees” you are a complicit devaluer,a race to the bottomer, a destroyer of our craft, and a slave to the publisher.

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