Learning curve for learning to compose minimal orchestral cues….

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Art Munson 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #30175 Reply

    ChuckMott
    Participant

    Without the derisive laughter 🙂 what would be a likely learning curve for someone who is pretty well versed in theory to start writing some orchestral minimal tension cues ? And do we think the ones available through East West subscription will cut the the mustard qualitywise….doesn’t need to necessarily mean Hollywood Strings.

    #30180 Reply

    Musicmatters
    Participant

    Hey Chuck,

    I think that you should go for it. In my experience, whenever I have written something in a non familiar genre, the first few cues are no good but if you keep doing it it starts to get better. Listen to a lot of real orchestral music and study a little counterpoint. East West is good enough to get started. Good luck and have fun !!!

    #30181 Reply

    ChuckMott
    Participant

    Thanks, I appreciate . Yes it is in response to a need. I’m getting to a point where I am only writing to specific needs, adn to satisfy my other side, will write more artist related tracks, and trying to keep those licenseable . Going back and doing some songwriting also, which is something used to do before I went al completely “library instrumental”. Seeing now it is possible to do both.

    #30182 Reply

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    I’d say go for it Chuck. Robin and I write in many different styles and some of those have been very successful, in terms of money earned.

    #30191 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    In all seriousness, Chuck, and this is not snarky or derisive, I’ve spent a lifetime learning to write orchestral music and have a long way to go. I try to improve every day.

    Suggested reading:

    The Principles of Orchestration by Rimsky-Korsakov
    The Study of Orchestration by Samuel Adler
    The Professional Orchestration Series by Peter Alexander
    Composing Music for Film by Jack Smalley

    Yes, the East West subscription libraries should work.

    #30192 Reply

    ChuckMott
    Participant

    There are some elements when I am listening to a library brief for tension tracks, though, that , although they are asking for light orchestral tension, there are elements that don’t seem to be traditional orchestral things happening. Not going to post the link to their briefs, so about as close as I could find this morning, was something like this. Specifically I am referring to the percussive elements they are using. Any clue what some of this instrumentation may be, beyond obvious “string section ” parts.

    #30193 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    A filtered drum and cymbals. The lighter instruments sound like they are from Cinematique.

    #30194 Reply

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    You can’t go wrong with Omnisphere, IMHO, for adding touches subtle or bold.

    #30197 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    You can’t go wrong with Omnisphere, IMHO, for adding touches subtle or bold.

    +1.

    Zebra is also good.

    #30198 Reply

    LAwriter
    Participant

    Chuck – the “good news” is that I wouldn’t really consider that “orchestral” music. It has orchestral elements, but the approach and sounds are more pushed towards electronic than orchestral. If you want to write that kind of music, get yourself a few good synths, some great percussion libraries (not drums, percussion), a good string pad – and just follow your instincts. Good to go.

    The “bad news” is – as Michael described – a lifelong pursuit if you are trying to write true orchestral musics.

    #30199 Reply

    woodsdenis
    Participant

    Good take on this Chuck.

    As others have said the video just has a few orchestral elements, Symphobia is on sale now maybe worth checking, basically pre baked sections which sound great.

    https://www.projectsam.com/Home

    Having seen and witnessed orchestrators on film scores do their thing, its a life long learning curve really. What I guess you are aiming for is to add orchestral textures to tracks to give a hybrid type sound.

    #30200 Reply

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    +1 on Symphobia. Very helpful.

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