Selling Stock Music Vs Selling Beats

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  guscave 1 week, 3 days ago.

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  • #31189 Reply

    Filipe
    Participant

    Hi Everyone.

    I have been researching a lot about making money selling beats online until I finally started to know more about these stock music libraries we all talk about here and so I have gotten a bit confused and started wondering how different both of these marketplaces work. Are beats meant to be sold on completely different stores than regular stock music?

    For instance, let’s say I produce a trap beat primarily meant to be uploaded on beat stars (or any other well-known beat stores website), would I be still able to use that beat and upload it on stock music libraries? Or should I approach stock music in a completely different way when it comes to producing for these stock libraries?

    The question remains the same if I would do the other way around as well (producing a song for stock libraries purposes and still use it on beat websites marketplaces like beat stars, airbit etc ).

    Hope my question makes sense, looking forward to see your answers !

    #31190 Reply

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    For instance, let’s say I produce a trap beat primarily meant to be uploaded on beat stars (or any other well-known beat stores website), would I be still able to use that beat and upload it on stock music libraries?

    As long as you are NOT giving exclusivity to any one entity you can sell where ever you like. It would then depend on whether any stock music library would accept beats or whether Beat Stars would accept songs.

    #31191 Reply

    Filipe
    Participant

    RIght…makes sense. My main question is basically this:

    if a regular hip-hop , trap or r&b beat you find on a site like beat stars can actually be considered as normal stock music and also be submited to those stock music libraries, I don’t really understand why most producers making beats for beat stars and YouTube don’t also upload on these stock libraries like audio jungle . Are they that lazy so that they don’t take the extra effort to make more money with their music, or is there a logical reason for them not to make the most out of both worlds and only stick to those popular beat stores? Or are they just not aware about these stock libraries sites?

    I actually wanna put my future beats not only on beat stars, but also on audio jungle ,pond5, youtube, ,etc etc and I don;t really see many producers doing this. so i just need to make sure if it’s a smart thing to do, or if there is any caution about this decision….

    #31192 Reply

    MaLmusic
    Participant

    I think you have to be careful with Youtube’s adrev program, or whatever it’s called. Some music libraries don’t accept music that is part of Youtube’s adrev program. If I’m not mistaken, many beatmakers use BeatStars to get Youtube royalties, so if that’s your case, you might not be able to upload that music to some music libraries. And when you sell your beats online non-exclusively to rappers, there’s a big chance one of them will submit the track to Youtube’s program at some point, and it can end up becoming a mess to deal with.

    I’m not saying you shouldn’t give it a try, but yeah, do some more research, and always read contracts carefully.

    #31193 Reply

    guscave

    I don’t really understand why most producers making beats for beat stars and YouTube don’t also upload on these stock libraries like audio jungle . Are they that lazy so that they don’t take the extra effort to make more money with their music, or is there a logical reason for them not to make the most out of both worlds and only stick to those popular beat stores? Or are they just not aware about these stock libraries sites?

    The difference is that both platforms cater to different markets. Beatstar’s clientele is mostly rappers looking for instrumentals they can rap over. The music is very beat structured without any edit points or melodies that will distract the vocals.

    Stock music libraries cater more towards video producers who need the music that can stand on it’s own, have clear edit points and constantly moves forward without getting in the way of any dialog (if any). The copy & paste method that tends to be used to sell beats doesn’t work very well with stock music sites.

    #31195 Reply

    Filipe
    Participant

    Starts to make more sense to me now! Thanks guys!

    #31196 Reply

    Kubed
    Participant

    Guscave is 100% correct. Beatstars and stock music sites are completely different markets with different clients.

    Also,while it’s fine to call your music “beats” in platforms like Beatstars,it’s not a good idea to do the same in stock music libraries. Pond5 & Audiojungle clients want to hear a complete instrumental track and the term “beat” is a bit (no pun intended!) misleading.They’ll possibly think all you have to offer is a drum beat and they won’t listen to your music.Better use the term “track” in your descriptions (i.e. “trap track”) and maybe use the term “beats” in your tags.

    Btw,some stock music sites (like Audiosparx) have non-exclusive terms BUT you can’t delete your music from their catalog (contract length is in perpetuity!). In case some Beatstars client offers you good money to buy the exclusive rights of your track,you won’t be able to accept their offer if the track is also uploaded to Audiosparx. Food for thought! Take a close look to the contract terms of each contract you sign.

    #31197 Reply

    Filipe
    Participant

    Once again, Kubed and Guscave, thank you so much for taking the time to clarify my confusions and questions. Your answers already made my first payment on this forum worth it. Cheers : )

    #31201 Reply

    guscave

    Btw,some stock music sites (like Audiosparx) have non-exclusive terms BUT you can’t delete your music from their catalog (contract length is in perpetuity!). In case some Beatstars client offers you good money to buy the exclusive rights of your track,you won’t be able to accept their offer if the track is also uploaded to Audiosparx.

    Most Beatstars clients understand that any beats they buy (exclusive or non exclusive) have most likely been sold to other Artists. So when they buy an exclusive license, the exclusivity only applies to usage after their date of purchase.

    I think the sample licenses in Beatstars website indicate this.

    #31281 Reply

    seaneman
    Participant

    Most RF libraries’ legal terms of use do not allow the creation of derivative works from tracks in their catalog, so uploading beats expecting people to use them in that way is barking up the wrong tree.

    #31332 Reply

    blackstop

    I produce production music clearly targeted for sites like Jungle and Pond5 and I upload my tracks to over 10 stock music libraries with non exclusive deal. But I have also uploaded my music to beatstars mainly for that extra stuff they offer, like a ProPage, a nice media player and Soundcloud monetization.
    I’m really new to beatstars and have less expectations than the other stock library sites, but I’ll give it a try…

    #31333 Reply

    guscave

    The Beatstars and Airbit markets are extremely over-saturated. You can make money but it’s definitely a numbers game. The guys making 6 figure salaries have well over 100 beats available and are uploading new tracks almost on a daily basis.

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