Titling with high end vs low end libraries

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  • #22619 Reply
    bjpuddy
    Guest

    Hi,
    I just joined a couple weeks ago and have really enjoyed reading through all the threads here. Thanks for all the info so far.

    A question about titling – If I am submitting to a general library my understanding is to create a title that sets the mood. My question is – if I am doing a cover of a well known public domain song – would I still do that or use the title?

    Second question – would you title the same way if you were submitting to a lower end library vs. a library like Crucial Music? For instance, for Crucial, would you give the song a proper real-world title, or still title it as the mood keywords?

    Thanks for any advice!

    #22620 Reply
    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    If it’s Public Domain I would use that title plus a mood or style. Say “Jingle Bells Hip Hop”.

    With Crucial (or any library) I would still try to convey the feeling and/or style. We have one titled “Lovers In Tuscany” which I think conveys the type of cue it is.

    #22622 Reply
    Gael MacGregor
    Guest

    bjpuddy,

    As a music supervisor, if I’m doing a search for music and run across several tracks that (from the metadata) seem to fit the mood of the scene, which title do you think I’d listen to first?:

    (1) RG41
    (2) Smokin’ Guitar God
    (3) Rock Guitar

    You always want to title a cue in such a way as it creates an impact, regardless of where you’re sending it/making it available.

    I’m unlikely to listen at all to (1), may only listen to (3) if I can’t find anything else, but will surely listen to (2) when I’m seeking a blistering guitar sound.

    And Art’s advice is good with respect to the PD titles — use the well-known PD title and spice it up with whatever the style happens to be. Note that when you’re recording a PD tune, it’s not, technically, a “cover”. “Cover” implies copyright ownership, and there is none for songs in the public domain.

    #22626 Reply
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    Naming tracks is an interesting subject. My experience is that a library track name is ideally short, evocative, and not too vague. However, at the higher end of the business – trailer licensing – the names start getting vague and mysterious. Think names of ancient cities or gods from obscure mysticism : )

    #22705 Reply
    bjpuddy
    Guest

    Great input. Thanks all!

    #23629 Reply
    DDP
    Participant

    But if everbody with a rock guitar in there track named their track “ROCK GUITAR [numeral]”, how confusing is that for the Music Supervisor?

    #23630 Reply
    Mark
    Guest

    But if everbody with a rock guitar in there track named their track “ROCK GUITAR [numeral]”,

    I don’t see where anybody in this thread advised doing that.

    #23632 Reply
    DDP
    Participant

    I wasn’t suggesting anyone was.

    But if people NOT in this forum who also create production music had a similar approach to a naming convention, things would get confusing quick … I’d assume.

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