I would be really grateful for feedback and advice

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  • #35228 Reply
    sergiomusic
    Participant

    Hi everyone!

    I’m rather new to the library world so I’ve been surfing the forum reading about different topics. First of all, thank you for everyone who is sharing their valuable input. There is so much information here, it’s a gold mine! I’ve particularly found many tips/comments from @Mark_Petrie very useful and concise.

    I would really love to have some feedback to a track I uploaded on youtube recently, please. (sounds, composition, mix etc). Also, how would you categorize this tune? Would this fit in a library? (apart from the fact that it’s most likely too long for that..) I understand that there are many types of libraries who might (or might not) specialize in specific genres. However if you could put me on the right track, that would be really helpful.. I’m happy to do research, I’m just not sure where to start with this one. Or maybe for this particular track, looking for a Library might not be the best?

    Thank you so much!

    #35230 Reply
    mikevan
    Participant

    Hi Serge
    one of the most useful assets of a library producer is the ability to do timed edits of their tracks: 30, 60, maybe 90 seconds, stingers… Full tracks may typically range from 2:30 to 3:30. The track is really nice and sounds professional, good composition and arrangements, reaistic orchestral sounds and nice mix. It also seems to work very well under images of nature so I guess it has potential for documentaries or cinematic videos. You just need to apply your skills as an editor and extract a (or even two or three) 3:30 edit that still works fine. You can have different versions maybe with different intensities to give variation and choice to a supe. I think most libraries could use cinematic tracks like this but you could go and listen to what they have in those categories and find a good match. Nice work.

    #35231 Reply
    sergiomusic
    Participant

    Thanks @Mikevan! You are absolutely right, this is something I need to apply myself to do.
    Can I ask, what is your process? When you compose, do you already think about the edits, and so you adapt your ideas as you compose so that you can have suitable edits? Or do you compose freely and then somehow rework on the arrangement to make the edits?
    Thanks a lot for taking the time to listen and the advice!

    #35235 Reply
    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    When you compose, do you already think about the edits, and so you adapt your ideas as you compose so that you can have suitable edits? Or do you compose freely and then somehow rework on the arrangement to make the edits?

    I always cut my alternate mixes from the main mix. There are some conventions I follow in the original composition though. No fade examples would be one example but I can usually find acceptable edits. On the other hand many times experienced music editors will cut their own from the full mix.

    #35236 Reply
    mikevan
    Participant

    I generally cut my edits from the main mix too and it helps to think of tracks in sections so it’s easier to cut and paste different sections or themes. I usually prepare a very short button end and maybe a short version of the intro for 30 and 60 sec edits, they can come handy when you have to be precise with the time. Probably not applicable to this style but I always extract a few drum fills to use in transitions, it could be a timpani roll or a harp cascade or violin run, some element that may help tie different sections more naturally.. Also having stems ready may help when you cut a section and need an instrument to keep playing on the first beats of the new section, to avoid cutting notes or reverb tails, you might need it in this style. So, yes, thinking ahead may save you some headaches later but I never do stuff like having the sections last for x seconds so adding them up I get maybe 60 secs…

    #35239 Reply
    sergiomusic
    Participant

    I always cut my alternate mixes from the main mix. There are some conventions I follow in the original composition though. No fade examples would be one example but I can usually find acceptable edits. On the other hand many times experienced music editors will cut their own from the full mix.

    Thanks for the reply Art 🙂 and thanks for having created this amazing ressource!
    Sorry I’m a bit confused. What is the difference between main mix and full mix?
    When you say “no fade examples”, do you mean that you never use fading within your composition? What sort of conventions do you usually follow when you compose, if you don’t mind me asking?

    Also having stems ready may help when you cut a section and need an instrument to keep playing on the first beats of the new section, to avoid cutting notes or reverb tails, you might need it in this style. So, yes, thinking ahead may save you some headaches later but I never do stuff like having the sections last for x seconds so adding them up I get maybe 60 secs…

    Ok, thanks @Mikevan Can I ask why you prefer to cut edits from the main mix (I assume that when you guys say main mix you mean the bounced/mastered track right?) as opposed to cut edits in the project? Do you find it quicker? I suppose it depends on the style yeah

    Thank you guys 🙂

    #35242 Reply
    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    What is the difference between main mix and full mix?

    Same thing.

    When you say “no fade examples”, do you mean that you never use fading within your composition?

    I only meant a fade ending.

    What sort of conventions do you usually follow when you compose,

    These are some generalities. No intros, only an A section that builds. Sometimes an A and B section. Best thing is go to some top libraries and listen.

    #35253 Reply
    sergiomusic
    Participant

    Ok thanks Art!

    #35257 Reply
    mikevan
    Participant

    Yes, i find it’s usually faster to cut the main mix down for almost any style if there are definite sections. Generally using two tracks or crossfading gets good results even if you have to cut parts of a section. As I said, having small elements to connect sections like a drum roll can help mask little inconsistencies and make transitions smoother. There are a few cases when I really have to go back to the mix project and do some custom transitions but having stems reduces the need a lot (I seldom even use stems). Be sure to have a limiter in the editing session if you add elements to a full mix or crossfade sections: you don’t want to get digital distortion.

    #35279 Reply
    sergiomusic
    Participant

    Ok cool, thanks Mikevan 🙂

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