If you thought the Blurred Lines lawsuit was crazy

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  • #22559 Reply
    MichaelL
    Participant

    But…if we’re talking about people taking samples without regard to IP rights, then I say go for it.

    Read this:

    http://ajournalofmusicalthings.com/this-copyright-lawsuit-over-sampled-breakbeats-could-change-the-way-music-is-composed/

    Watch this:

    #22563 Reply
    Vlad
    Participant

    Perhaps I didn’t read closely enough! If it was illegal sampling then yes, the lawsuit is surely fair game.

    #22564 Reply
    woodsdenis
    Participant

    This particular case is about the actual beat, the plaintiffs do not own the sound recording. Ironically the actual sample has been used many times on hip hop tracks.

    #22566 Reply
    MichaelL
    Participant

    This particular case is about the actual beat, the plaintiffs do not own the sound recording. Ironically the actual sample has been used many times on hip hop tracks.

    This is why putting it front of jury scares me. IMO Twelve average people are not the best method of discerning the nuances of copyright law.

    Generally a “beat,” that is not a sampled recording, is beyond the purview of copyright protection because it’s too generic. The chances that Zimba Ku were the absolute originators of this beat are minimal. But, whether or not a jury will be able to grasp why that matters is another question.

    #22567 Reply
    woodsdenis
    Participant

    This is why putting it front of jury scares me. IMO Twelve average people are not the best method of discerning the nuances of copyright law.

    Generally a “beat,” that is not a sampled recording, is beyond the purview of copyright protection because it’s too generic. The chances that Zimba Ku were the absolute originators of this beat are minimal. But, whether or not a jury will be able to grasp why that matters is another question.

    I totally agree, another angle on the case is that maybe the “sampled” usage was actually licensed from the record company and legit whereas this case is about composition and a very big record. Where theres a hit theres a writ, as they say.

    #22572 Reply
    Tbone
    Participant

    If it wasn’t sampled then I think it’s very bad form for sites to be saying it was. Like the “whosampled” website has me understand it that way.

    Also MichaelL: that Amen break video is absolutely bonkers. I remember seeing it a while ago and thinking but.. but.. that break is on like 1000s of tracks AND it’s even on royalty free drum loop packs which state “our beats are 100% royalty free”, and I’m talking big companies too.

    I think that one is a really, really extreme case though. I wonder what could even be done about it now.

    #22576 Reply
    MichaelL
    Participant

    There are two other possibilities going on with this case.

    1) After Blurred Lines case, these plaintiffs feel like having a go at the wheel of fortune too.

    2) After a study of several years, the US Copyright office released a report in which it recommended some sweeping changes to US copyright laws to reflect how music is written, produced and distributed today –that might have an effect on suits like this.

    In other words, they may be trying to get this suit filed while they still have the opportunity.

    #22583 Reply
    yzzman1
    Participant

    Wow

    #23428 Reply
    realstacktrace
    Guest

    There’s no question Jessie J sampled Black Heat in “Price Tag.” Did Jessie J’s camp not clear the sample?

Viewing 9 posts - 11 through 19 (of 19 total)
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