Exclusive vs. Non-Exclusive Strategy?

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This topic contains 286 replies, has 32 voices, and was last updated by  MichaelL 4 months ago.

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  • #8941 Reply

    Mark Lewis

    Some like Coke, some Pepsi. And there’s nothing fatal about drinking both from time to time.

    Just don’t drink the Kool-Aid

    #8942 Reply

    Advice
    Participant

    I have to wonder why the re-titling libraries don’t form an organization, like the PMA, to set standards for themselves, and for writers. More importantly, I wonder why they don’t band together to develop and promote the technology suggested above, that would preserve their business model. Perhaps they don’t look at the “big picture” as much, and /or consider the common good of the industry.  

    I had the same thought. For one thing, they could have agreed on a standard for how they re-title such as Original Title – Tag so that at least when music sups get music from mutliple sources, it would be more obvious and easier to sort out. It might prevent sups from (sometimes) listening to the same cue more than once… same title (execpt tag), same composer = same cue.

    Of course, that could be *very naive*, especially assuming how end users would react or feel comfortable. But the thought that they should form an organization and set standards crossed my mind.

    🙂

    #8943 Reply

    Advice
    Participant

    Again, to reiterate a point I think Michael made… We’re not talking about whether or not to have music in non-exclusive libraries that re-title. The issue at hand is whether to have the same cue in *multiple* re-title libraries. Everyone has to do what they are comfortable with, weighing pros and cons, potential risk vs. benefit, etc. We don’t know what we don’t know and we can speculate endlessly as to what will happen over the next few years.

     

    #8945 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    Just don’t drink the Kool-Aid

     

    Mark…I thought that was funny, until I realized that a huge percentage of the writers here were born long after that cultural reference occurred, and I was in college!  🙁

    But hey, we old guys have something to be happy about…a new Jimi Hendrix “album.” 🙂

    _Michael

    #8964 Reply

    Mark Lewis

    Hey, this landed in my inbox recently,
    http://us5.campaign-archive1.com/?u=55d26a15d70d9b10f5f835b86&id=7b09f90171&e=3bfad89466
    This guy is apparently an ASCAP representative and he is speaking directly to the point about fingerprinting and tunestat and such. According to him they have a long way to go technology-wise before the PROs starting using it to track performances.
    The main reasons
    false positives and types of performances

    -Mark

    #8967 Reply

    More Advice
    Participant

    Hey Mark,

    This is just another exclamation point on the exact point I have been trying to make. Everyone needs to take a chill pill about the ramifications of re-titled works. As of now, and into the next few years, nothing is going to change in my opinion and frankly I am not worried about 3 years from now. I focus on the business on a quarter by quarter basis for back end and front end. Human verification of cues used  will never be taken out of the equation. Watermarked or fingerprinted detections will not be able to report feature uses, theme uses, background uses, time of day uses, etc…just too much data to be looked at in order to calculate what is owed.  There is no reason for everyone to hit the panic button and shovel all their cues (for no compensation) into exclusive shops, out of fear. In fact, do the exact opposite.

     

     

     

    #8968 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    One key point the article makes is exactly what I said: fingerprinting only detects performances. That’s it. It doesn’t identify any of the other, critical, information that is found on cue sheets.

    frankly I am not worried about 3 years from now. I focus on the business on a quarter by quarter basis for back end and front end.

    There’s isn’t an MBA on this planet who would consider that to be a good business policy, especially in a business, where conventional wisdom says it takes 5 years to succeed. Try asking the CEO of Apple or microsoft if they aren’t looking past 3 years.

    For writers, I think a balanced strategy and 5 year plan is a good idea.

    #8969 Reply

    Advice
    Participant

    No panic here… There is one reality that sometimes needs to be dealt with now. Some networks and/or TV production companies are saying they will no longer accept non-exclusive music. So, in that case, perception is reality. If they believe there is a problem, there IS a problem, at least from the POV of you getting your music on THOSE shows. Of course, if those shows are in the minority enough, it might not be a problem.

    We also know that some libraries believe there is a problem and again, perception is their reality. If the two libraries (one starts with “J”, one with “S”) that get the majority of my placements stop pitching their non-exclusive catalogs (admittedly, it hasn’t seemed to happen yet), then I have to concern myself.

    Anyway, it’s not just OUR perception of the situation that matters. It’s that of everyone in the industry– music sups, libraries, etc. as well.

    😀

    #8970 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    We also know that some libraries believe there is a problem and again, perception is their reality. If the two libraries (one starts with “J”, one with “S”) that get the majority of my placements stop pitching their non-exclusive catalogs (admittedly, it hasn’t seemed to happen yet), then I have to concern myself.

    What I’d be interested in knowing is the difference between who they pitch their non-exclsuive catalogs to v. their exclusive catalogs.

    I have a friend who takes the exclusive route with one of those libraries, and he’s convinced that he gets better placements.

    #8972 Reply

    More Advice
    Participant

    Michael L,

    I love the “Lawerly fight” you always have in you. You are one prudent and wise man. I can honestly say that, for me,  there has not been 1 single bit of difference wheteher the cue was E or NE in any of these libraries. If the cue is in the search engine and the clients are allowed to dig around for cues…your cue is in the search engine, and has just as good of a chance of getting used as anyone else’s cue.

    I have a NE cue that became a theme of a show. This same cue is also getting used on other shows as background. I hope it will end up on a TV spot too some day as that was what it was originally written and recorded for and has that kind of vibe to it.

    Here is the way I see it….these companies have, for very selfish reasons, intimidated all composers into filling up their exclusive drop boxes because it serves THEIR INTERESTS, not the composers, by promising “better placements” and “increased opportunities”. I just don’t see this happening right now.

    I have spoken to licensing execs at NBC and Gaming companies and they all say the same thing. I asked them point blank “Are you guys only licensing tracks from exclusive publishers and if so do you think composers should align themselves with E companies?” They all replied, 3 executives,  “go NON EXCLUSIVE!” but at the same time, they use both kinds of companies…They don’t care where the music comes from, their concern is whether or not they are getting the right music tracks for their jobs.

     

    #8977 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    I love the “Lawerly fight” you always have in you.

    Thanks. I knew I didn’t waste those grueling years of study. 🙂

    I have a NE cue that became a theme of a show. 

    Excellent. Grow and prosper!

    I have spoken to licensing execs at NBC and Gaming companies and they all say the same thing. I asked them point blank “Are you guys only licensing tracks from exclusive publishers and if so do you think composers should align themselves with E companies?” They all replied, 3 executives,  “go NON EXCLUSIVE!” but at the same time, they use both kinds of companies…

    That’s what I like, Information based on experience and direct communication. There’s no reason for them to not use exclusive companies.

    FWIW…I didn’t say that my friend was correct. He may just be rationalizing the decision.

    Continued success Good Advice!

    _MichaelL

     

    #8982 Reply

    More Advice
    Participant

    Greatness matters too…I’m not great, but that “first call” session guitar player I hired for many of my tracks sure does make a difference. A library owner and I were chatting about that the other day. He asked: “Are you a guitar player?” I said “no, but I use the top call session guy every chance I get.”  He replied…”It really is amazing how much of a difference that makes.”

    Great players make a difference. I used the guy that was “Top call” for 20 years…the 4 sessions a day, every day, guy. The guy that could dial up any guitar tone you played for him in 3 to 5 minutes. I’d say “get me Kieth Richards tone from Jumpin’ Jack Flash for this track”…bingo….task complete in about 3 minutes.  That’s why I have a couple dozen tracks getting multiple, repeat uses…the cream rises to the top guys!

    My advice: use amazing players when you can…and believe me…these libraries posturing as “EXCLUSIVE FROM NOW ON”…Don’t worry…if the track is amazing…they will take it in non-exclusively!

    Good luck all! Happy composing!

    #8984 Reply

    Advice
    Participant

    My advice: use amazing players when you can…and believe me…these libraries posturing as “EXCLUSIVE FROM NOW ON”…Don’t worry…if the track is amazing…they will take it in non-exclusively!

    While I agree that greatness matters, I’ve not seen (in *MY* experience) libraries who have committed to exclusive only change their policy because a track is great. It usually makes things too complicated to make exceptions. Most often, they don’t pitch one track at a time, they send hard disks or other media with many tracks and the terms generally have to be the same for all of them.

    I’m sure anything is possible and I certainly don’t claim to know everything or be sure of everything.

    😀

    #8986 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    My advice: use amazing players when you can

    +1….now THAT is good advice!!!!

    Not only can they “dial up” the sound, they’ll bring the right axe!  I guess that there’s a ton of writer’s here who worry about whether or not to buy a $100 plug-in, let alone spend three times that to hire top player, but it’s well worth it.

    Funny you brought that, because I just decided to start hiring players again. It can be cost effective. A good player will cut tracks ten times faster (and better) than you can fake it with samples.

    _Michael

     

     

     

    #8987 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    GEEZ!!!!! Which one of you is giving the BEST ADVICE???? 😀

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