Yet Another ReTitling Question

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  • #9235 Reply
    scottcampbellmusic
    Participant

    Hi all,

    As I may have mentioned before, I’m brand new to this biz, and this site, so if this has been covered somewhere, plz point me in the right direction! I only had the energy to get about halfway through the existing retitling threads

    QUESTION: I hear a lot about LIBRARIES retitling, but, is it legal/a practice for the COMPOSER to retitle? The application would be to discourage price shopping between RF libs and a disconnect from other NON RF, NON-Exclusive libs as well as allow for a pseudonym for further separation

    I’m talking strictly non-exclusive and RF(non exclusive). Exclusive libraries are exclusive, one track, one title, one library(who may choose to retitle, np), no questions.

    Thanks for any pointers or experience(s).

    #9236 Reply
    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    While some might disagree with the practice, I’ve been doing it for years. Illegal? I doubt it but I’m not an attorney and you should consult one if you have doubts.

    #9250 Reply
    Michael
    Participant

    Following on from the scotcambellmusic question.

    There have been several cases of plagiarism down the years ,one of the most famous involving George Harrison, but has anybody ever heard of a music library taking a composer to court?

    #9251 Reply
    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    @Michael. I think you are confused by the question. You can’t copyright a title so plagiarism doesn’t apply here. The George Harrison case was about “My Sweet Lord” being a lift of “He’s So Fine”. At least I think that’s what you are referring to and that’s a whole different issue.

    #9252 Reply
    Michael
    Participant

    Thanks Art,your quite right,I did get them mixed up.

    #9253 Reply
    Desire Inspires
    Guest

    QUESTION: I hear a lot about LIBRARIES retitling, but, is it legal/a practice for the COMPOSER to retitle?

    If you own the rights to the composition, you can enter into any deal that you choose. The entity that controls the copyright has the legal authority to enter into any beneficial deal. This is why owning the copyrights to your music can be highly beneficial.
    Once you sign a contract with a company, you may end up giving up certain rights to your music. Study each deal carefully to avoid any future conflicts of interest.

    #9257 Reply
    Mark Lewis
    Guest

    The application would be to discourage price shopping between RF libs and a disconnect from other NON RF, NON-Exclusive libs as well as allow for a pseudonym for further separation

    Lots of composers do this. There’s no real issue, definitely no legal issue.
    It’s just kind of lame if a composer uses this method to sell the same music on one site for $1.99 and on another site for $49.95.
    But if the customer can’t find the same version it’s not a huge deal.
    But if you think your music is worth a certain price it’s probably good to maintain that price as much as possible across the different sites.

    -Mark

    #9258 Reply
    MichaelL
    Participant

    Lots of composers do this. There’s no real issue, definitely no legal issue.
    It’s just kind of lame if a composer uses this method to sell the same music on one site for $1.99 and on another site for $49.95.

    +1  I agree with Mark. If you’re doing it to sell the same music at vastly different prices, it’s not a great idea. But…if you’re talking about different kinds / levels of music, that’s another story.

    If you compose a lot of one genre, say rock, and you want to do electronica or hip hop, maybe you’d want a pseudonym to establish another persona in keeping with the genre. For example, Skrillex sounds a lot more “electronic” than Sonny John Moore. On the other hand, if he ever wanted to do country music….

    I’ve been thinking about pseudonyms and/or business identities, mainly as a way of delineating “product lines” ….not disguising the same music.

    I was asked by an exclusive library to write under several pseudonyms, for various reasons, including avoiding over exposure and/or to avoid getting pigeon-holed.

     

    #9259 Reply
    scottcampbellmusic
    Participant

    Hey folks,

    Thanks for all of the feedback. You’ve spelled out (very nicely) what I’ve been trying to piece together in my mind for quite some time now.

    Interesting thought of using a pseudonym for branding purposes, never got that far in my thinking. Will have to chew on that a bit as well.

    Again, thanks for all your responses. I’m slowly getting more and more miles under my feet 🙂

     

    #9260 Reply
    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    I’ll have to disagree a little bit about pseudonyms when dealing with the Internet and reaching an audience through the net. What with Google placing more and more importance on “authorship” and your “brand name” you might want to think twice about it. Google wants authenticated content when returning search results and branding yourself is important in the eyes of Google. Think about everything you post on the net including song descriptions. The more it can all tie back to your “brand” (meaning you) the more weight Google places on your content. Search for “Google authorship” to read more.

    Anyway it’s the path I’m following. I’ll let you know if it actually works! 😉

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