Art Munson

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  • in reply to: Spotify buys music production marketplace SoundBetter #33239

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    Bump

    in reply to: Alt versions on Tunesat #33009

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    Now I don´t know if i don´t HAVE any detections or if it doesn´t work because I use all alternative mixes in one track (which makes the track up to 10min long).

    I would think all mixes in one file would create a different digital fingerprint than one mix in a file. Just a guess as I have never tried it.

    in reply to: Reversion Clause Advice #32983

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    Three years would be enough for me.

    in reply to: PMA Libs. for Americana Tracks? #32972

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    You do not have permission to view this content.

    in reply to: Explain the Problem with Subscription Sites? #32929

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

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    in reply to: Feedback on this please? #32903

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    I use the Triple Play when it comes to smooth voice leading with small sections of orchestral instruments, I’m much faster (to arrange and perform) on the guitar with the triple play.

    Thanks Paul for reminding me to use my Triple Play more!


    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    from my perspective price dumping results in lower monthly earnings.

    Can’t say that for myself.

    “Just who is defining “quality”
    I’d have to say that the buying public define it, but also site curators who also are musicians (we hope at least) define it by curating the music and having taste and intuition based on experience of “what works”.

    Argument still applies though. One person’s trash is another persons treasure.

    I don’t know these people personally, but from the discussions I have had with some very experienced players in the business both writers, library owners, and employees of some stock music licensing platforms, they all talked about answering to “investors.”

    So? That doesn’t change the reality of what is happening. We live in a capitalistic society and if investors see oppotunity they will act on it.

    When you google search “stock music”, “Production Music” , “Royalty Free Music”…most of those companies showing up on page 1 are backed by hedge funds, venture capitalists, etc

    How can you possibly know that? Where’s the hard data on “most of these companies”?

    The policies and business models they have been enacting these past 2 years really seem to be putting all stakeholders involved on a slippery slope. As far as solution goes: well we actually were in a good place when a price floor was put in at $20, but now the policy has changed and we’re seeing a trend of much lower prices.

    Prices, and the business, has been trending lower going back much further than 2 years.

    Lower prices result in less revenue. I have verified that because I figured “hey let’s give it a shot”. Well it does not work.

    That’s your experience. Just because you say it, does not make it true.

    I am not initiating a “bitch fest” just trying to create some lively discussion about where we’re headed into the future because it looks pretty dicey to me.

    Yes it does look dicey but “lively discussion” aside. What is your solution?

    This is exactly my point and it is exactly why everyone should charge a respectable price.

    In a fair and ideal world, sure. But if you had a library company you would still be driven by these same market forces and struggling to compete.

    There has to be a better way.

    Back to my original response. “Music is business, business is war, war is hell, adapt or die!”

    Thread closed…


    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    they go on a search to find the right track for their project and the price of the track is the last thing they are worried about.

    That, I can agree with.

    These “sales” are desperate and pointless.

    If they didn’t work, the world would be “sale” free.

    Cues that never sell essentially just fall into the garbage bin and are obliterated into ether dust. They essentially are not even inventory any more because they are buried into non-existence within search engines.

    That is not necessarily correct. Case in point: We had an alt mix of a track that had not sold in five years on one site (it has sold on other sites). That track finally sold and ended up in a Gorton’s Fish Stick commercial and will probably generate about $1k based on the occurrences picked up by Competitrack.

    Dropping prices on tracks that have not sold previously has resulted in sales for us. Are you saying composers should not have the opportunity for more sales because you do not like their pricing? Remember these are tracks that have not sold. If they start getting traction I will raise their prices.

    You “win” with quality music

    These kinds of comments always amuse me. Just who is defining “quality”? After all one person’s trash is another person’s treasure. I’ve heard a lot of quality music (IMHO) that does not sell and vice versa.

    You “win” by understanding publishing and how PRO’s pay. You win by gathering the data from clients as to how they intend to use the track? Web only? TV Spot? radio Spot? TV show? Vlog? Podcast? Film?

    This I can also agree with and I think most successful libraries try to do that.

    These ignorant venture capitalist “investors” do not understand any of this.

    Just who are these ignorant venture capitalist “investors” you are talking about? How many libraries do they control? Data? What is your solution?

    You folks are implying that there is little money to be made? Then why are venture capitalist investors jumping in this game? They jump in because they see an opportunity to exploit.

    Again, reality strikes. How do you propose to stop them exploiting opportunities? After all we are a capitalistic society. Once again, what is your solution? Is this just another b*tch fest?

    Selling music is not like selling apparel.

    Ah, actually it is. Not to us, of course, as creators. The end user, whether they pay $15 or $100, is just looking for something to get the job done. In the end, it’s just product.


    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    I’m checking back through my posts to see if I said that.

    If I did, I need My Head examined!!

    Ha, ha, ha! No my friend, it wasn’t you. 🙂


    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    In response to Music1234, this is my own personal perspective.

    “Music is business, business is war, war is hell, adapt or die!”

    I came up with this phrase in 1980 when I was burnt out on studio and road work as a guitarist. I was no longer a writer/producer at A&M and was trying to figure out what to do next. That led me to building a studio in my home and teaching myself to engineer. This was at a time when home studios were cropping up all over L.A and the big commercial studios were incensed. They were doing their best to put us all out of business by reporting us to zoning. Didn’t work, and there are now home studios everywhere!

    This is just one example of how “nothing changes but the changes”. Just because something is true today doesn’t mean it will be true tomorrow!

    This is also a story about capitalism, Econ 101 and supply and demand.

    Reality is reality. You can bang your head against it all you want, but that doesn’t change it. Today we live in a global economy where an accomplished composer living in a third world country is happy to make $50, $100, $200 a month. This is our competition folks!

    There is a story on The Society Of Composers & Lyricists web site https://thescl.com/mission-and-history/ that tells the frustrating tale of trying to fight reality. These were the biggest composers of their time, and they still could not prevail over the music business, which was effectively screwing them over.

    We all want to make money with our music, but if our only goal is making money — and we have no love for what we do — what’s the point? The other day someone said, “Just ‘write hits’ and you will make a lot of money in production music.” God, how many times have I heard that over the years?! What is a “hit”? My response was, I can only write what I write. Trying to fit myself into a mold has never worked for me, and it takes all the pleasure out of creating music.

    And let’s face it: Music is product and, as in any business, we just want to move product. We have had more than a few businesses and have always had sales. Sales do work! It doesn’t mean you have to have sales constantly — doing so diminishes their effectiveness. But you can’t blame a business for wanting to stimulate sales!

    As far as investors go; I find the best revenge is to be an investor! Invest in the stock market, real estate or — whatever. Study and learn. Fortunately we have been able to do well in the market, but others have had success in real estate, Amazon stores, Ebay, even Bitcoin. Invest in yourself and create a business. Heck, I was flipping homes in the 70s in L.A., in the middle of a busy music career. Robin and I also created a web site in 1994 that turned into a successful business. We sold it 10 years later, at which point we entered the production music business. Through it all, we never lost our love of creating music. I don’t mean for this to be all about me or us. The point is, I think, one has to be a serial entrepreneur to survive.

    Of course there will always be that 1% of composers/artists that beat all the odds where everything falls into place! But, it’s always been my philosophy that you have to have multiple income streams. If you’re of a certain age with a family and responsibilities, I think it’s tough to put all of your eggs in the music “basket”. If you’re young and single it’s a totally different ball game. I would advise a young composer to move to L.A. (or other suitable location) and get on the inside track. That’s what I did in the 70s, and I know younger composers doing that now.

    So, I repeat: “Music is business, business is war, war is hell, adapt or die!”

    in reply to: Contract Help Newbie #32828

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    You just said it all in one really. I’m curious to know anyones experience with xxxx cues. The rating on MLR is the highest I’ve seen.

    If you have a question about a particular library please leave it on it’s listing.

    in reply to: Tweaking some older royalty free tracks…. #32817

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    Would you replace the old mixes in libraries, or submit the new ones under a new name [ie; “Old Name (2019 Mix)]?

    I keep track of all versions in my internal records. If it’s new and the old one hasn’t sold I delete the old and re-upload. If the old one has sold I keep those that have sold and may change the title (if it’s better) or add “New Version”, to the new version. I usually end up changing the title. If you add something like “2019 Mix” you are locking yourself into a date that might look stale in 2025! 🙂

    in reply to: Spotify following? Promote ourselves? #32807

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    Do exclusive libraries like JP, SK etc allow you to also put music on Spotify, iTunes etc?

    No blanket answer here. Better to check with each individual library.

    in reply to: Katy Perry lawsuit #32771

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    And that’s the problem with juries of lay people trying to decide copyright issues. Total BS. I don’t hear it. Do you?

    in reply to: soundroyaltis.com – Possible scam? #32767

    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    Don’t know why you would call this a possible scam without knowing any details. Similar to https://www.royaltyexchange.com/ and they have been around for years.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 2,241 total)