Mixing On Headphones

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  • #14157 Reply
    mscottweber
    Participant

    I also used Sony 7506’s for a long time, and just recently switched to a pair of Shure SRH840’s. Much more comfortable to wear, and they sound WAY less brittle. All of that gunk in the mids that the Sony’s conveniently leave out, I hear it now…

    Someone on another message board posted this link, which looks pretty informative:

    http://www.headphone.com/buildAGraph.php?graphID%5B0%5D=2231&graphID%5B1%5D=3281&graphID%5B2%5D=2441&graphID%5B3%5D=&scale=30&graphType=0&buttonSelection=Update+Graph

    #14158 Reply
    Blind
    Participant

    Even though they are no substitute for accuracy of monitors, I really like my Ultrasone 650s. I bought them in part for the ear protection features that they have, but really like the spacious sound.

    #14160 Reply
    SongLoft
    Participant

    http://www.headphone.com/ is the company I used. Service and selection were top notch.

    Headphone choices in particular seem to be very subjective. Perhaps it’s the unique shape of our ears that make one’s experience so different from anothers. I still think though that you can’t go wrong with either of those Sennheiser or AKG lines.

    There are the ultra high end ones like Grado or Audeze ($1945 for the Audeze LCD-3!) but for me they make things sound “too good” for general reference mixing.

    For me, everything other brand / model I tried besides Senn and AKG was too lacking or too hyped although Beyerdynamic DT 770 PRO is another popular choice that is supposed to reveal the low end pretty well.

    good luck

    #14162 Reply
    seaneman
    Participant

    I use the Sony7506’s for about 80% of tracking, editing, and rough mixing. I’m totally used to how they sound and they are as predictable as any source I have. For me familiarity trumps accuracy for doing the grunt work of arranging, editing, and roughing. I like the way they fit and refoam the ears when/if they get scratchy. I have worn many more expensive cans that were not comfortable or long stretches, or got loosey-goosey on my melon(AKG for sure). I always check against my big and small monitors, and the mini-van before I sign off on a mix anyway. Nine times out of Ten, with maybe a little low end roll-off, the Sony cans are good to go. At what…..100$? What’s not to like?

    #14163 Reply
    danleigh
    Participant

    Check out this article, it helped me out a lot when I was trying to figure out which headphones to get. I have the Sony MDR7509HD’s and Audio Technica ATH M50’s and they are both amazing. The Sonys have a really open, defined midrange that is great for mixing in particular. I wouldn’t want to listen to them all the time but they reveal a lot of flaws which is helpful!

    http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan10/articles/studioheadphones.htm

    #14164 Reply
    Vlad
    Participant

    Beyerdynamic DT 880 pro. These sounded exactly like my Mackie HR624’s in a treated room…..with one exception: on the cans I could hear what was happening in the low end with a touch more clarity. It was a little more defined below 80hz.

    I use them only for checking mixes.

    In addition, I have another pair of no name $12 headphones that is the last check I do on a mix after aventones, Mackie, and DT 880’s. Those little no name garbage headphones help spot high end oddities on occasion.

    #25719 Reply
    soundspot
    Participant

    I know this topic is way out of date but thought this might be useful for people who work in headphones a lot or write when traveling…

    This fantastic tool has made mixing on headphones a much more enjoyable and “real world” experience for me:

    http://www.newaudiotechnology.com/en/products/spatial-sound-card/

    It’s the first virtual room monitoring plugin I’ve found that sounds real. They’ve taken impulses of some fantastic rooms and monitoring systems in them, and it makes working in headphones a very pleasant experience… It’s also quite handy for listening across various speakers in different rooms.

    #25725 Reply
    dpwaveheavy
    Participant

    It would appear that Focal’s Spirit Professional ($349) cans are changing the game. Some pro mixers have said they would be comfortable mixing with them only.

    #25729 Reply
    soundspot
    Participant

    Hey Dpwave. I have a pair and use them daily… I Couldn’t recommend a better headphone, especially when compared to higher priced offerings from Sennheiser etc…
    Very comfortable, easy on the ears for sure, and the sound is absolutely lovely…
    Cheers

    #25730 Reply
    Art Munson
    Keymaster
Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 34 total)
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