Non exclusive to exclusive

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  • #10368
    Desire_Inspires
    Participant

    Stay non-exclusive, Jay. You seem to be doing well.

    #10583
    erock
    Participant

    As I mentioned on another thread. I submitted a track that is currently in a few non-exclusive libraries to an “opportunity” only to find out that it was an exlusive publisher deal. I told them that I’d have to decline because it was in a non-exclusive library and they said it was ok, “just don’t sign it with any other publishers.”

    So I’m kind of confused and haven’t taken any further steps on it.

    Is this situation common?

    #10584
    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    @erock: They must like the track. As far as common, what is these days! Kind of up to you. If they are a known quantity and you think it’s worth it I would make sure you have a reversion based on some kind of performance on their part. I wouldn’t do it unless I was really sure about them. That’s just my two cent opinion.

    #10585
    Advice
    Participant

    TV Composer Guy… While the jury still is out on this while exclusive vs. non-exclusive, I wanted to comment on the library you mentioned (“C….”) that is still very successful with major network and film placements while remaining non-exclusive.

    It could very well be that because they established themselves SO well early on in this game and have such a great reputation with the sups they service, they were able to continue as non-exclusive, simply adding tags to track titles. Libraries with less well established relationships and reputation may not have the same luxury.

    It also seems that the lower end blanket license market, such as for cable TV, is very affected here by this whole issue. I don’t think J…. and S…. are pushing exclusive just for the heck of it. Cable TV production companies see themselves paying blanket fees to multiple companies, only to find they are seeing a lot of the same tracks. So they feel they are wasting money.

    All that being said, I also continue to get non-exc placements for those blanket cable deals and can’t say if that will dry up in the next few years or not.

    #10586
    Desire_Inspires
    Participant

    I am sticking with the libraries that get me placements. I will just treat every deal as exclusive and leave it at that.

    #10587
    More advice
    Guest

    Those poor networks. I feel so sorry for them. They have to pay those terribly expensive license deals (often $0) to get access to the same tracks from our two favorite libraries mentioned above. What a shame! (YES THIS IS SARCASM)

    I actually don’t feel one bit sorry for Discovery, TLC, History, Bravo, A& E, MTV, VH1, etc… I say “Gee Network execs. I really feel so bad for you guys. It’s a shame that you are graced with all this music content and pay such small fees, but at the same time your editors have to listen to the same track from 2 different libraries. That’s really a shame and we’re so sorry for this inconvenience!”

    Guys, a good friend of mine just had a very successful run writing custom “exclusive” music for 19 Kids and Counting and John and Kate plus 8, but now Discovery decided to go with library music only for a great majority of their shows, yet they are disappointed that they may have to hear the same tracks from 2 different catalogs?

    Well we’re just so sorry guys, really sorry this is such an inconvenience to your producers and editors.

    To all you cost saving execs at the networks, regarding all the free music content you are being served up in multiple catalogs I say to you:

    You can’t have your cake and eat it too, if you want custom, exclusive, and properly scored cues. Hire some pros to do it and pay them a work for hire to custom score every show you create.

    I asked JP point blank 2 weeks ago in a conference call what the big noise is all about regarding E and NE and the response was “editors are just sick of hearing the same tracks in multiple catalogs” Well, gee we’re so sorry. I encourage everyone to request a call to hear it from the horses mouth what the real story is behind the E noise. Personally, I will never go exclusive unless folks want to buy some of my music.

    I have a lot more to add to this topic. I’m busy mixing some tunes today. I just wanted to slip this thought in.

    P.S…I am still selling tracks for $100 on P5…I even put one up the for $600 yesterday.

    #10588
    Jay
    Guest

    I have a lot more to add to this topic. I’m busy mixing some tunes today. I just wanted to slip this thought in.

    P.S…I am still selling tracks for $100 on P5…I even put one up the for $600 yesterday.

    I just finished cranking up all my prices (WAY UP) @ my RF sites today…maybe i’m missing something but the networks having to hear “some” of the same tunes from different libraries can’t be the ONLY reason companies are moving towards the exclusive model..if someone can elaborate on that i’d really appreciate it..i’m sure it has something to do w/$ – I actually think by raising your prices you’re setting yourself apart and even standout in a crowded market…more of us should raise prices..think about it..so maybe you don’t get all those emails saying you’
    you’ve made a sale (only to find you made next to nothing) but then you get one or two sales that equal 10 or more of those mini micro sales..we own the content…why are we selling ourselves short @ these sites ?

    I say crank’em up 🙂

    #10589
    music_pro
    Participant

    More advice, 100% with you on that.
    I can understand that they done like it but yes, they just have to deal with that if they want “free” music. Now, as long as there will be exclusive companies getting started or non-ex libraries changing their biz model to exclusive, the editors will stay “spoiled”. They will get free and exclusive music, what a deal, good for them.
    But I tell you what, if your music is really good and really good for the scene, they will handle hearing it from two different sources.

    #10590
    Desire_Inspires
    Participant

    Recently I pulled music from two royalty free sites that had sold my music for micro money. I placed a group of cues at another site and set most of my prices at $250. I put a few at $100 as a loss leader to get people interested. I have not had great success with the royalty free model yet. A few sales here and there for a few bucks. Hopefully I will start to see some sales from the new venture and begin to make some money.

    #10593
    Tv composer guy
    Guest

    It also seems that the lower end blanket license market, such as for cable TV, is very affected here by this whole issue. I don’t think J…. and S…. are pushing exclusive just for the heck of it. Cable TV production companies see themselves paying blanket fees to multiple companies, only to find they are seeing a lot of the same tracks. So they feel they are wasting money.

    Cable TV productions aren’t paying blanket license fees, they get it all gratis, rarely do they ever have to pay a blanket fee, if they do it is very minimal. Like I said before, I have worked directly with music supervisors & they have told me they are getting tracks thrown at them for free by non exclusive libraries…. we didn’t tell the libraries to do that, they are part of the reason license fees have eroded

    I asked JP point blank 2 weeks ago in a conference call what the big noise is all about regarding E and NE and the response was “editors are just sick of hearing the same tracks in multiple catalogs” Well, gee we’re so sorry. I encourage everyone to request a call to hear it from the horses mouth what the real story is behind the E noise. Personally, I will never go exclusive unless folks want to buy some of my music.

    If the titles are the same, the editors don’t have to listen to the same track twice, they would recognise the title & move on. The problem was that they didn’t know they are listening to the same track again until they heard it as it was retitled.

    Also apparently publishers were fighting over who placed the track (slightly unprofessional)…..if they didn’t give away the tracks for free in the first place, they wouldn’t have to fight over who got paid. Also composers were apparently calling production companies asking who placed the track (also unprofessional).

Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 70 total)
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