Royalty Free Music versus Stock Music

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This topic contains 18 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  MichaelL 7 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #25973 Reply

    LAwriter
    Participant

    Art – my point is, I don’t think it deserves a new topic, but I’m unsure about the “definition” of “on topic”. IMO composer f’s comment was “on topic” but argumentative. So…. go figure. I’ll continue to browse and mostly keep my mouth shut. I value what you’re doing here and don’t want to derail…. Cheers,

    #25975 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    I will say I enjoy the topic and discussion, and believe it’s one that should be discussed openly and candidly.

    It’s not a “topic” requiring discussion. It only required an answer. The question is an inquiry into the industry standard terms.

    As a practical matter, when you see the terms Royalty Free Music and Stock Music, one might assume that they are the same thing. If not, how do they differ? For example, PTrax sells both Royalty Free and Stock Music. Because some of the titles and artists overlap it suggests that there’s potentially something different in how each is treated under its terms of use.

    As Mark said: single use vs. pay once use forever. Question answered.

    There isn’t meant to be an implied “which is better?” in the subject heading. “Royalty Free Music versus Stock Music: Which is Better?” would be a different topic.

    #25977 Reply

    LAwriter
    Participant

    Michael – while I agree with your definitions, it is interesting how common use of language often changes definitions over the years. Annoying, but definitions change whether we want them to or not.

    My favorite musical definition pet peeve – R&B now meaning hip hop instead of classic tunes of the Motown era. 🙂

    #25978 Reply

    MichaelL
    Participant

    Michael – while I agree with your definitions, it is interesting how common use of language often changes definitions over the years.

    Agreed, but the definitions are Mark’s

    In this case, I just wanted to know, from a Royalty Free library owner, what the dfference in terminology means in the the context of Royalty Free libraries like his (ML) and PTrax.

    Yes, back when I started writing production music, during the Roosevelt administration (Teddy not Franklin) any music that was not “original” (now called “custom”) was “Stock Music” (or in the negative “canned” music). 😀

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