Subscription Survival…..

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  • #29949 Reply
    Jerzy
    Guest

    Thank you Art – this is exactly what I mean.

    And yes, Paolo, opinions might be “rooted quite a bit in personal preferences and experiences” but it gives you something to start off of and won’t stop from forming your own in the end.

    Now, Music1234 – as long as I am not violating this forum’s policy regarding self-promotion here is my website – http://www.jag7music.com – and my email – [email protected]

    So far I started with pond5 although didn’t have the time to place enough material to have any results. Also, believe that an exclusive library, once accepted, will really push the music because it’s “their” money as well.

    Appreciate all responses.

    Thank you,

    Jerzy

    #29950 Reply
    LAwriter
    Participant

    I think we need to be nimble and try to think outside the box.

    YES Art! This has always been my philosophy and has served me well too. I think that’s pretty much all we can do. Look to the future and not to the past, thank smart, and stay on our toes….

    LA Writer. Just hang in there, Your voice and wisdom are needed.

    Ha! Kind words Music1234. Sometimes it seems more like the voice of gloom than wisdom. I hate the way the industry has become these days. Everyone – publishers and writers alike – in lock step marching for the bottom. I love mentoring up coming writers, but it’s hard not to feel disingenuous – giving them advice when you feel a future career is not looking like a true option. I’m sure I’m over-reacting, but I’ve honestly never seen things looking so dismal And we haven’t even been discussing A.I. LOL

    Cheers all,

    -=LAWriter=-

    #29951 Reply
    Music1234
    Participant

    I actually felt as though the bottom was in at $19 to $20 a license, but for some reason someone always has to try to be extra nice. Wow, crashing to 12 cents per unit cost (in your example above), from $19 seemingly overnight is pretty insane.

    Which brings us to the next question: Why do people want to be nice (and cheap) to corporate customers? Who needs music for films, YT videos, spots, and TV shows? Corporations do! of all sizes.

    News Flash to music writers and music publishers: Corporations have truck loads of money, start charging them some money for your service. We’re not in business to serve the amateur hobbyist music listener or youtuber, we’re in business to service corporations and businesses. This is not a spotify subscription model for God’s sake. Wake up and smell the coffee!

    #29952 Reply
    MichaelL
    Participant

    And we haven’t even been discussing A.I. LOL

    Let’s start. An agency friend of mine in NYC pointed out that computer-generated voice overs are now being used on some low-end projects. Despite having tons of money, there are some projects that corporations simply don’t deem worthy of unjustifed expense, even to the point of accepting mechanical narration as “good enough.” The amount of money that a customer has isn’t relevant to what they are willing to pay for something. If you have $1,000 in your pocket you don’t walk into McDonald’s and offer to pay $20 for a burger.

    We’re not in business to serve the amateur hobbyist music listener or youtuber,

    Libraries don’t see it that way. Many (not all) of the subscription plans are limited to such low-end use, while preserving higher-end license fees. Keep in mind the Google/youtube is giving away music to youtubers. And, if you haven’t heard, they are demonetizing videos for youtubers who do not have 1,000 subscribers and/or 4,000 hours viewed. Both of which mean that low-end users will have even less incentive to buy music, or post videos for that matter.

    Podcasting is another target market for subscriptions. I don’t even know how anyone makes money doing that. However, the technology exists to monitor, measure, and pay composers for podcasting tracks acquired under a subscription license. Whether that will pay anythng close to a typical RF license, I don’t know.

    So, why do “composers” contribute to the subscription model? LAwriter brought up a very valid point when he said:

    I have no idea where this music is coming from that’s going into these libraries. Maybe folks who live in Indonesia with a laptop and internet connection living on $20 a month?!?!?!

    You are absolutely correct and that cannot be overlooked or dismissed. There are thousands of individuals creating “content” in less affluent countries for whom the micro dollars generated by streaming and subscriptions do indeed amount to a lot of money, relative to their circumstances..

    These “composers” are literally putting thousands of tracks into the marketplace every month. So, to say all we have to do is refuse to participate is pure fantasy. They aren’t interested in our “first world” problems or our hardship of having to get by on less the 100K per year. Unfortunately, even if they were sympathetic, only a tiny minority of composers spread around the globe will even read any of these threads and hear the message. We can pack up our tents, but they will keep feeding the machine.

    LAwriter also said:

    I have no idea if people are so desperate to make ANY money in the music business that they will sell their souls and futures for a couple of puny licenses….

    Yes, see above. But also, to be honest, I think we are dealing with new generations that have normalized the devaluation of music. Perhaps starting with file sharing on Napster and Pirate Bay they have come to think that music should be free.

    There are actually people on youtube who complain about the high cost (seriously!?!?) of AJ licenses and they post tutorial videos showing how to remove AJ watermarks.

    We’re talking about an element that simply doesn’t care that people are actually trying to earn a living from putting music into libraries, all of which stems from the basic premise of “music should be free.”

    All that said, I think you can preserve your naturally optimisitc spirit LAwriter. Technology, like Blockchain, will have a major impact on keeping track of things and legislation will, hopefully, catch up to technology. https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/8383741/music-modernization-act-passes-us-house-of-representatives

    When RF libraries began back in the 1980s, (I helped start one of the first, now defunct) I’m sure some composers thought the sky was falling. It didn’t. Similarly, when online RF libraries started, almost 20 years ago, I’m sure some traditional libraries and composers thought the world was going to end. It didn’t. When people started selling 200 tracks of production music on CD for $99, it didn’t end then either. Change is inevitable. You adapt. You roll with it. You reinvent yourself yourself. You update your catalog AND you keep writing!

    We need to modify our expectations for the economic potential of production music. There’s simply too much of it entering the pipeline every day, from highly-competitive sources, for it to all hold value. So, you up your game. That’s what competition is all about.

    #29953 Reply
    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    Great post MichaelL and well put.

    #29954 Reply
    Music1234
    Participant

    Libraries don’t see it that way. Many (not all) of the subscription plans are limited to such low-end use, while preserving higher-end license fees. Keep in mind the Google/youtube is giving away music to youtubers.

    My advice to all, let the low end scavangers stay low and in the garbage can. Every time in my professional life I thought about ways to make money from those who don’t have money, you end up regretting it and well….not making any money!. Recording bands for $30 an hour, targeting companies that don’t have big marketing budgets. Forget about all the garbage and stick it in the low end of the trash can. Just go after corporations that actually have money to spend. That’s what LA writer (I think) means by don’t participate.

    Laptops in Indonesia? Let them rock it out…Heck I have garage band on my i-phone, forget about lap tops man I got a phone with beats already made! I can just render and sell.

    Aim low, stay low. If any writer can chime and and say I am making 3 to 5K a month in the subscription model, I will listen. I do believe that perhaps the site owners can make that kind of money (or even more), but again the million dollar question is how are they distributing the fees to contributing artists?

    When I think about it, I do earn the most money where my music is priced the highest and has the most amount of “human feel” in the performances. Now isn’t that a convenient coincidence!

    Regarding robotic voice overs. That is around, has been around and gets hung up on a lot. That too will end up in the trash can. No one will ever want to listen to an audio book if a robot voice is delivering it. It’s fine for on hold messages, but if the intent is to “engage” “teach” “train” or “entertain” an audience, you better spend some money on a human voice!

    How many of us press 0 (to get a human) the moment we are forced to talk to the robot? For example, when you call a bank, or credit card company, or insurance company.

    But I do agree that writing hits is the only answer. Hit tracks will always equal money in the bank.

    #29959 Reply
    BEATSLINGER
    Participant

    My advice to all, let the low end scavangers stay low and in the garbage can. Every time in my professional life I thought about ways to make money from those who don’t have money, you end up regretting it and well….not making any money

    Preach Brother Music1234, that’s REAL TALK!!

    But I do agree that writing hits is the only answer. Hit tracks will always equal money in the bank.

    Hit Tracks, or having a close friend/family member that is already plugged into the top tier is the ONLY way you’re getting into the real money libraries!!

    If you are brand new to the production music game, YOU are probably THE MOST dis-advantaged group EVER. There is now so much bad/mediocre product, and so many lower tier libraries/RF sites/subscription services to “get lost in; while they claim grandiose success'”.

    You will need to find multiple ways to separate yourself from the “mediocre pack!!”

    Firstly, find “Your OWN Unique Style/Take on Music, and Refine & Polish it like a Rare Jewel!!”

    When I first started in the music business (A LONG time ago.lol) It cost $80-100 Bucks an hour for studio time. a 3 song demo was about 6,000 to 7,000. NOW that is literally a WHOLE STUDIO at your house, and you can write 1000’s of tracks. With everything at your fingertips whenever you want to create. “There is now ZERO excuse for LOUSY/MESSY/UNDER-PRODUCED MUSIC!!!”

    #29961 Reply
    BEATSLINGER
    Participant

    Sorry Art, maybe I’m just tired.lol I went to post again, it looked wrong, then edited it. Now I am lost again.. Hahaha

    Maybe I should just give up..

    #29963 Reply
    Art Munson
    Keymaster

    Sorry Art, maybe I’m just tired.lol I went to post again, it looked wrong, then edited it. Now I am lost again.. Hahaha

    You screwed up a blockquote. That’s why it went wrong. I fixed it for you.

    #29964 Reply
    woodsdenis
    Participant

    Like Art and MichaelL have said many times here, its always about not putting all your eggs in one basket and more importantly looking at the global picture in this internet age. What models will be here in 10 years ? IDK but looking back at what worked and mulling over it won’t change it.

    Lets accept the fact that the subscription model will have music to fill it for the very reasons MichaelL has said, now by all means withdraw your tracks, that is not going to kill it or affect it in any way unfortunately.

    I remember Art saying this eons ago regarding all new business models “never say never”. TBH I will go and investigate what the different subs are about I currently don’t have any tracks in them currently.

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