Mark_Petrie

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 406 total)
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  • Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    How about this one!

    in reply to: Mixing my own music. Should it be left to the pros? #45292
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    As others already said, it’s probably a bad idea to do this, because it’s not sustainable for a lot of library music work.

    However… as someone who can do a half-decent mix of my own work (nothing amazing but good enough for TV), I still benefit a ton from having a pro mix my work, which happens most of the time because I have sought out libraries that pay for it.

    If you’re starting out and aiming more at the kind of library that needs more quantity of tracks than quality, then I would suggest it’s best to try to crank up your own mixing skills as soon as you can.

    But if you’re already a pretty good composer and producer, and aiming more at the higher end – like libraries that focus not just on unscripted tv but also sync fee generating placements like tv ads and trailers, then I actually think it might be smart to present your tracks in the best way possible… paying even $600 for someone great to mix a track could be a smart investment.

    in reply to: Composer from UK, trying his best… #45058
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    I always recommend just listening to and studying high quality trailer music from companies like Audiomachine, Colossal Music, Brand X etc. Here’s a good list: https://boldvoid.com/blogs/ressources/comprehensive-list-of-trailer-music-publishers

    When you listen, pay close attention to how a main idea (or ‘hook’) is used throughout act 1 (world building, setting the atmosphere), act 2 (energy and propulsion focused), and act 3 (massive arrival, tension released and new levels of drama reach a finale).

    in reply to: Composer from UK, trying his best… #45053
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    Nice tracks Dave.

    You have a wide range of genres there. My advice would be double down on just 2 – 3 genres you really enjoy working in, and getting your tracks in those genres to be even more authentic and pro-level produced.

    The rock tracks seemed to be really well mixed, I’m not an expert in that area but they really impressed me.

    I’m more of a cinematic, trailer focused composer. So if I was to judge those kind of tracks I heard, I’d say they need quite a bit of work in the arrangement, structure and overall authenticity to the genre. i.e. it’s not really enough to sound like trailer music, it has to sound exactly like trailer music.

    If that’s an area you want to work in, then I’d recommend you immerse yourself in the genre (like you need to do with any genre really). You have to do reverse engineering of successful tracks, learn the patterns, tropes and voicings that have worked in the past. Learn how to write short hooks that can go the length of a 3 act track (not 3 sections… 3 dramatic ACTS). Then somehow build on all that knowledge to then write innovative music, stuff that pushes the envelope enough that it sounds ‘fresh’.

    in reply to: Work for Hire agreement with added viral clause #43896
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    You could always agree to some kind of recouping where you split some of the expenses? Maybe that would soften them up. Otherwise, just ask for a really good fee, a kind of ‘FO’ fee, something you would feel comfortable working at but otherwise happy to walk away from.

    in reply to: What Genre of Library Music Sells The Best? #43525
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    Tip #1: watch a range of TV shows that aren’t scored, i.e. that use a ton of library music.

    Tip #2: within those genres you hear, focus on ones that you would enjoy working on, are already really good at, or can quickly improve at. You want to be one of the best sources of that genre… being an average version of what’s already being done by 100s of other composers is not the way to go.

    in reply to: Big Publishers #41676
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    Extreme

    in reply to: FOX Networks #41675
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    Library and PRO should chase it for you

    in reply to: What’s the path from Library Composer to Theme Tune? #41660
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    I’ve had library tracks get used as themes before. Have a few running at the moment. The thing those tracks have in common is that I spent what most people would think is a ridiculous amount of time for library music… I took the time to really try to make them thematic, catchy and evocative. Most of them also have live instruments and a pro mix/master.
    I guess it’s a lottery but it’s not just about dumb luck – you can increase the odds by a focus on quality over quantity. I probably spent a week on each track.

    in reply to: Good libraries for sports cues, ala David Robidoux? #41555
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    Yeah you do but some libraries are known for being responsive – WC comes to mind. Others are not so much. Start at the top and work your way down the food chain if you don’t get any hits with the big libraries.
    Btw – great orchestral sports music can be a real winner thanks to its shelf life. Some of the sports music I did over a decade ago that was recorded live and mixed professionally still generates a bit of income for me today.

    in reply to: Good libraries for sports cues, ala David Robidoux? #41547
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    Most libraries want this stuff if you can do a great job. Try for the majors – UPM, WC, BMG etc.

    in reply to: Sync license fee for a documentary #41154
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    I agree mostly with Music1234’s advice, except: “tell them you want 100% writers Share and 100% publishing share of the performance royalties”… you don’t need to tell them you want it, it’s a license so implied in that is you will be getting all that.
    And – $2000 is most likely very high for a Europe only, $200k budget track. Chances are they’ll be able to license a great track from any major library for far less. Like less than $500. I’d suggest $500 might be all you could ask from a project at this budget level.

    in reply to: Telemundo Royalties? #41076
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    It will probably fall under ‘Local Tv – Blanket’ which as you know has typically low rates.
    one of my recent statements includes:
    – one line of 24 plays adding up to about $14 a minute for an afternoon airing
    – one line of 25 plays adding up to about $17 a minute for primetime
    – one line of 11 plays adding up to $0.26 a minute for an afternoon airing
    – one line of 1 play – a segment theme used in an awards ceremony (yay!), 4 seconds for $227.

    So it’s all over the place, but really depends on how much the show re-airs.

    in reply to: Stem File Tracks #41022
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    Yeah you still get paid royalties as if they used the full mix.

    in reply to: Identifyy / Haawk has anybody any experience? #40990
    Mark_Petrie
    Participant

    “your advice is to go on with Identifyy as music libraries and broadcasters will not have any issue with strikes as they pre clear all the music they use?”

    Sorry what I meant was that libraries should be using Content ID as another income stream… if you’re writing for libraries that will own the music (exclusive deals), then definitely DON’T register them Identifyy or any other Content ID company. The library should be the one to do that.

    Also for non-exclusive deals, you have to watch out as some libraries won’t take music registered with a CID company. If you’re writing non-exclusively for ‘royalty free’ music / stock music companies, they often insist on you NOT signing your tracks up with CID. That said, there are non-ex RF libraries that are happy to let their composers do it, and have a simple system for white listing customers’ videos when necessary.

    I just thought it was odd that that guy “Adam” – a library owner, would have such an outdated perspective on CID. It’s only an issue for clients that want to monetize or make their videos mostly ad-free. The big broadcasters and media companies are immune from this issue as they have separate deals with Google for their channels. Maybe he said that a long time ago? Content ID was a scary thing when it first came out but in recent years pretty much every mainstream library has embraced it as a significant extra income generator.

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